Darling by Rachel Edwards

A quiet, chilling, slowly unfolding mystery, Darling is a disturbing story of a teenage girl and her stepmother.

Darling by Rachel Edwards

Genres: Mystery, Thriller
Published: 17th May, 2018 (expected)
Goodreads | Book Depository | Amazon UK
Series: N/A
Rating: 3

Lola doesn’t particularly want a new stepmother. Especially not one who has come out of nowhere and only been with her dad for three months. And – she’s not racist or anything – but since when did her dad fancy black women anyway?

Darling didn’t particularly want a new stepdaughter. Especially not one as spiteful and spoilt as Lola. She does want Lola’s dad though. And he wants her, so that’s that: Darling and Lola will just have to get used to each other.
Unless Lola can find a way to get rid of Darling.


Darling had her fair share of abuse as a black woman living in England. The story often goes sideways, exploring her early life and how she was affected by racism from an early age. As a result, the narrative doesn’t flow as a domestic thriller usually does with twists and tension, but provides a saddening insight into the sort of life many people still has to endure even today. There’s an underlying mystery surrounding Darling White, but not in a creepy, sinister way.

Lola is a bright, but quite intense 16-year-old girl, who doesn’t want a stepmother. Especially not one who is the “wrong colour“**. She complains about her endlessly to her diary and her quasi boyfriend, Will, who wholeheartedly agrees with her sentiment and agrees to help her find some dirt on her.

**This is what Lola says in her diary. Just wanted to make it crystal clear that it’s not my opinion and I don’t think there are right or wrong colours when it comes to people.

Darling, a nurse by profession, is all kindness in return. All she wants is a family and make her new husband happy. Lollapalooza (as her dad calls her) just needs her affection, over the top love and the endless supply of Jamaican food. Her son Stevie gets along just fine with Lola, so she has high hopes that this whole situation will work out just fine.

As the author alternates the chapters between Lola and Darling, some secrets are revealed. Darling’s past was difficult, but just because she wants to hide some things, doesn’t mean she has done anything wrong. Or does it? Lola on the other hand has a history of slut shaming, reckless behaviour and general nastyness. Not very promising!

Thomas, the husband is somewhat oblivious and only seems to exist to facilitate the meeting between the two ladies in his life. I have to agree with Lola on the fact that their marriage was way too rushed after three months. If he had a solid reason for this, we never found out. His attitude towards the whole racial issue is strange. When Lola’s affiliation with a certain “white power” group comes to light, he dismisses it as a silly teenage thing, not even worthy of discussion. What?

A mildly thrilling read with a shocking end I did not expect, Darling will appeal to those who love getting into people’s heads and explore how they are affected by abuse, loss, and mental illness in the family.

I received a copy from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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21 comments

  1. Alex

    It sounds like the plot was sacrificed somewhat for background story, never a good thing unless that story is integral to the plot. A rookie author maybe a little too ambitious or not polished enough yet, in her storytelling? I won’t be adding this one to my list.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hmmmm… I like character driven stories but I’m not sure. I will keep it in mind though as it could be something slightly different for me to read… but it all honesty ‘mild thrilling’ usually doesn’t cut it for me. Even though I appreciate characters and their stories, I also NEED suspense… I’m a tough customer, I know. 😂😂😂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I don’t think I would like Thomas. He is way too oblivious and his views on racism, just nah. This sounds like an emotional read and I am curious about the themes so might just check it out. Great review, Norrie.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: Monthly Catch Up #5 – May 2018 | Reading Under The Blankie

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