6 books to read before they become TV series

Do you love TV series? Are you a bookworm? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then 2018 will be a good year for you. Bookish TV series are on the rise, and there will be plenty coming out this year for us to pick from. We must proceed with caution though, as many great books fell victim to screen adaptation over the past years. I still refuse to talk about the horror of watching the movie version of The Dark Tower. Just… Nope…

TV series are usually a safer way to bring life to our beloved stories. I loved the Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, and the series that came out last year with the same title was absolutely amazing, painting an even more terrifying picture than the book by expanding the plots of the secondary characters.

If you are anything like me, you will most likely want to read the book before watching the first episode of the show. You know, just so you can have enough ammunition to rage about later, that the book was better.

So let’s see what is waiting for those of us who love thrillers, sci-fi and a bit of weirdness.

Good Omens
Based on the 1990 novel Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman the TV series will follow the story of a demon and a fussy angel (both living amongst mortals) who are trying to prevent the coming of the antichrist and the ensuing battle between Heaven and Earth.
Guess who’s playing Crowley, the demon. David Tennant, that’s who. Love it! There’s no official release date, but according to IMDB we can expect it in 2019.

Altered CarbonThis juicy sci-fi, set in the 25th century, tells the story of Takeshi Kovacs, a soldier from an elite group of warriors who were defeated in an uprising against the new world order. Even though Kovacs was also killed, his consciousness and skills are downloaded (a.k.a. re-sleeved) into the body of a thug. This action and violence packed series, starring Joel Kinnaman as Takeshi Kovacs, will come out in February, 2018.
The series is based on Richard K. Morgan’s book with the same title, published in 2006.
A must for fans of the cyberpunk genre!

Sharp ObjectsGillian Flynn’s book, Sharp Objects is a delicious treat for anyone craving something dark and disturbing.
Camille Preaker, a journalist, returns to her hometown in Missouri, to investigate the murder of two young girls. If this wouldn’t be upsetting enough, staying in her parents’ house brings back unpleasant memories from her own childhood, and she’s forced to confront her own demons that led her down the path of self harm for years.
The show, starring Amy Adams and Chris Messina, is coming this summer.

The City & The CityBased on the multi award-winning novel by China Miéville, the series follows Inspector Tyador Borlú on his investigation of a murdered student whose body was found in the decaying city of Besźel. As evidence starts piling up, suggesting deadly conspiracies, the Inspector has to travel to Ul Quoma, the only metropolis on Earth.
China Miéville describes his own work as “weird fiction”, so if weird is your thing, don’t miss out on this one.

Instinct
This new police procedural series, starring Alan Cumming as Professor Dylan Reinhart, is based on Murder Games by James Patterson. Professor Reinhart is a criminal behavior professor who ends up helping Detective Elizabeth Needham, the NYPD detective in charge of investigating a serial killer case. The only clue linking the victims is a playing card left behind on the scene, hinting at the next target.
It’s coming in March, so you should still have time to finish the book before the show hits the screen.

You
You by Caroline Kepnes is yet another gem for those of us who enjoy exploring the depths of a twisted mind.
The show follows Joe Goldberg, a bookstore manager, who becomes obsessed with Guinevere Beck whom he met in his bookstore. The stalker turned boyfriend orchestrates the perfect plan to remove all obstacles that stand in their way.
The release date has not been announced yet.

Have you read all these books yet? TV adaptations yey or nay?

The Butterfly Garden by Dot Hutchinson

The Butterfly Garden by Dot Hutchinson
Genres: Thriller, Mystery
Published: 26th April, 2016
Goodreads
Series: The Collector #1
Rating: 3.5

Near an isolated mansion lies a beautiful garden.

In this garden grow luscious flowers, shady trees…and a collection of precious “butterflies”—young women who have been kidnapped and intricately tattooed to resemble their namesakes. Overseeing it all is the Gardener, a brutal, twisted man obsessed with capturing and preserving his lovely specimens.

When the garden is discovered, a survivor is brought in for questioning. FBI agents Victor Hanoverian and Brandon Eddison are tasked with piecing together one of the most stomach-churning cases of their careers. But the girl, known only as Maya, proves to be a puzzle herself.

As her story twists and turns, slowly shedding light on life in the Butterfly Garden, Maya reveals old grudges, new saviors, and horrific tales of a man who’d go to any length to hold beauty captive. But the more she shares, the more the agents have to wonder what she’s still hiding…


Dark. Creepy. Disturbing. I very much enjoyed the writing style, and how the author constantly played on our fear of the unknown.

Maya, the survivor, is an enigma herself. As the interrogation goes along, FBI agents Victor Hanoverian and Brandon Eddison grow more and more frustrated. With good reason, I would say. I loved the dynamic between these two; Hanoverian being the patient, fatherly figure, perfectly complemented by the explosive Eddison, who started banging his fist on the table not even ten minutes into the interview. I’m with you, dude… The more you find out from Maya (and let me tell you, it’s like pulling teeth), the more puzzled they get about her role in the garden. She’s cool as a cucumber, people. Not what you expect from your everyday kidnap victim, for sure.

There are a lot of great things in this book, if you can suspend your disbelief. The way the chapters switch between the present day, where we know Maya has escaped, and her time in the garden just keeps the pressure up constantly. The characters are great. Every single butterfly from the garden has a unique personality, and the Gardener (notice how he doesn’t even have a name) is super ominous.

If it weren’t for the “shocking twist” at the end, I would have liked this book much more. I found certain elements somewhat unbelievable, but then reminded myself that poor butterflies are basically teenagers, and probably shitting their pants too much to actually think straight. Mental and physical abuse does that to people. But it seems the author just had to throw in a plot twist, just for the sake of it, because people love plot twists, don’t they, even when it’s super “duh”. Well… Nope.

This book is not for everyone. It’s violent, graphic, and downright nasty, but I guess it’s just expected, when you decide to pick up a book about some obsessed guy, who kidnaps a bunch of young women and keeps them captive for his own entertainment.

The trouble with sociopaths, really, is that you never know where they draw their boundaries.

P. S. I also wanted to show you some of the international book covers. They are seriously pretty!

Bulgaria
Estonia
Poland
Slovakia

Get The Butterfly Garden (The Collector Trilogy) on Amazon UK.

The Wife Between US by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen

The Wife Between US by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
Genres: Thriller, Suspense
Published: 2nd January, 2018
Goodreads
Series: N/A
Rating: 4

A novel of suspense that explores the complexities of marriage and the dangerous truths we ignore in the name of love.
When you read this book, you will make many assumptions.
You will assume you are reading about a jealous wife and her obsession with her replacement.
You will assume you are reading about a woman about to enter a new marriage with the man she loves.
You will assume the first wife was a disaster and that the husband was well rid of her.
You will assume you know the motives, the history, the anatomy of the relationships.
Assume nothing.

This one was damn twisty, guys, damn twisty! You know how you get those blurbs sometimes, promising an edge of the seat thriller with unexpected turns and after the first chapter you just kind of roll your eyes and go “Yeah, right…” Well, this one promised a gripping thriller, and it delivered. Since we are told from the beginning that we are being played, the only thing left for us to do is to sit back and enjoy the ride.

I was properly hooked in from the get go. The chapters alternated between Vanessa, the “crazy ex”, and Nellie, a young and sweet pre-school teacher, preparing to marry the amazing Richard. There was one eyeroll-worthy moment at the end of the first part, and I thought “Oh, please not this again!”, but soon after that shit hit the fan.

Assume nothing!

There are quite a few domestic thrillers out there with similar premise: a woman obsessed with some dude who is married, has a girlfriend, not interested, you name it, and they just have to get him. Majority of these women however are rather insufferable. Just think of The Last Mrs. Parrish or The Girlfriend: both of those lead characters were proper bitches.

Vanessa comes across pretty unhinged, and yet I couldn’t help but feel sympathetic towards her. I loved her relationship with her aunt, and Aunt Charlotte herself is a pretty sweet character. With her calmness, and the air of artsiness around her she’s quite the opposite of Vanessa who is all over the place, and quite frankly a mess.

Set in New York, this quick page turner has great characters, an intriguing sub-plot, and an unexpected ending I did not see coming.

I’ll be on the lookout for more from this duo.

Get The Wife Between Us: A Gripping Psychological Thriller with a Shocking Twist You Won’t See Coming on Amazon UK.

Ran out of Stephen King reading material? These might just be the books for you

It was a sizzling summer day when, at the age of fourteen, I first came across a Stephen King book. My friend’s dad lent me his copy of Gerald’s Game, and it was love at first sight. I spent the entire day in my shaded room, sipping my ice cold lemonade (actually, it most likely was Coke), reading well into the night.

This was twenty years ago, and since then I have pretty much read everything the man wrote. I still need to get my hands on Sleeping Beauties, the book he wrote with his son, Owen, and Gwendy’s Button Box, a collaboration with Richard Chizmar.

You can imagine my delightful little squeal when I saw the master’s new book is coming in May. The Outsider has no official cover yet, but I honestly couldn’t care less.

But the wait is long, and it feels like May is still far, far away. There are some new books coming out this year that might just satisfy our dark cravings in the meantime.


The Chalk Man by C.J. Tudor

In 1986, Eddie and his friends are just kids on the verge of adolescence. They spend their days biking around their sleepy English village and looking for any taste of excitement they can get. The chalk men are their secret code: little chalk stick figures they leave for one another as messages only they can understand. But then a mysterious chalk man leads them right to a dismembered body, and nothing is ever the same.

 

The Storm King by Brendan Duffy

Nate McHale has assembled the kind of life most people would envy. After a tumultuous youth marked by his inexplicable survival of a devastating tragedy, Nate left his Adirondack hometown of Greystone Lake and never looked back. Fourteen years later, he’s become a respected New York City surgeon, devoted husband, and loving father.
Then a body is discovered deep in the forests that surround Greystone Lake.

The Hunger by Alma Katsu

Evil is invisible, and it is everywhere.
Tamsen Donner must be a witch. That is the only way to explain the series of misfortunes that have plagued the wagon train known as the Donner Party. Depleted rations, bitter quarrels, and the mysterious death of a little boy have driven the pioneers to the brink of madness. They cannot escape the feeling that someone–or something–is stalking them.

 

The Hollow Tree by James Brogden

After losing her hand in a tragic accident, Rachel is plagued by vivid nightmares of a hollow tree, and a hand reaching from it, begging her for help.

Terrified that she is going mad, Rachel experiences phantom sensations of leaves, trees, and finally a hand that grasps hers and pulls a young woman into Rachel’s world.

 

Obscura by Joe Hart

In the near future, an aggressive and terrifying new form of dementia is affecting victims of all ages. The cause is unknown, and the symptoms are disturbing. Dr. Gillian Ryan is on the cutting edge of research and desperately determined to find a cure. She’s already lost her husband to the disease, and now her young daughter is slowly succumbing as well. After losing her funding, she is given the unique opportunity to expand her research. She will travel with a NASA team to a space station where the crew has been stricken with symptoms of a similar inexplicable psychosis—memory loss, trances, and violent, uncontrollable impulses.

For the full list and description from the publishers check out  BookBub.

To see the Goodreads description, click on the book title you are interested in from the list above.

Beartown by Fredrik Backman

Beartown by Fredrik Backman
Genres: Contemporary, Fiction
Published: 25th April, 2017
Goodreads
Series: Björnstad #1
Rating: 5

The #1 New York Times bestselling author of A Man Called Ove returns with a dazzling, profound novel about a small town with a big dream—and the price required to make it come true.
People say Beartown is finished. A tiny community nestled deep in the forest, it is slowly losing ground to the ever encroaching trees. But down by the lake stands an old ice rink, built generations ago by the working men who founded this town. And in that ice rink is the reason people in Beartown believe tomorrow will be better than today. Their junior ice hockey team is about to compete in the national semi-finals, and they actually have a shot at winning. All the hopes and dreams of this place now rest on the shoulders of a handful of teenage boys.
Being responsible for the hopes of an entire town is a heavy burden, and the semi-final match is the catalyst for a violent act that will leave a young girl traumatized and a town in turmoil. Accusations are made and, like ripples on a pond, they travel through all of Beartown, leaving no resident unaffected.
Beartown explores the hopes that bring a small community together, the secrets that tear it apart, and the courage it takes for an individual to go against the grain. In this story of a small forest town, Fredrik Backman has found the entire world.


Beartown is one of those books that will stay with me for a long time. It’s a book about small town communities, mothers, fathers, team spirit, the sort of friends you have when you are fifteen, the love of hockey, and loyalty: to your team, to your family, to your town.

There are few words that are harder to explain than ‘loyalty’. It’s always regarded as a positive characteristic, because a lot of people would say that many of the best things people do for each other occur precisely because of loyalty. The only problem is that many of the very worst things we do to each other occur because of the same thing.

It’s dark and uncomfortable at places, but there’s always a glimmer of hope.

This book was an emotional roller coaster for me. I come from a small town myself, and know all too well how it feels when all eyes are on you and there’s no way to blend in to the faceless crowd.

There are thousands of ways to die in Beartown. Especially on the inside.

It takes great skills to manage such a large cast of characters efficiently, and Fredrik Backman does just that. All their unique voices come through clearly, hitting you in the feels with great precision. Beartown sucks you in, makes you wonder about the same things that occupies many of its inhabitants minds. Can winning a hockey match be more important than people? Even if that hockey is the town’s only chance of survival? Or are they just closed minded to think it is, and there would actually be other ways?

It’s a Friday in early March in Beartown and nothing has happened yet. Everyone is waiting. Tomorrow, the Beartown Ice Hockey Club’s junior team is playing in the semi final of the biggest youth tournament in the country. How important can something like that be? In most places, not so important, of course. But Beartown isn’t most places.

The town’s economy is dwindling, but there are still people who do much better than others. We get a glimpse into the lives of the rich and the poor just the same, and they all have their own struggles. Not even the most privileged ones have an easy time here.

A great deal is expected of anyone who’s been given a lot.

A horrible act is committed, and in its wake personal tragedies unfold. Nobody seems to be untouched by the events one way or another. The small community is divided. We, as readers are right there when the crime is committed, the silent witnesses all the nastiness. Yet, I think, there will still be some among us whose outrage will be entirely misplaced. I often entertain the idea that we, bookish people are gentle souls with open minds and a great sense for right and wrong. The truth is, people are people and some of us will bend the story out of shape, just to support our own ideas and beliefs, no matter how warped they might be.

They are probably people who live secure lives, who are surrounded by people who share their own opinions and only talk to people who reinforce their own worldview.

What can a friendship survive?

Beartown is not about happy endings. This is what I love so much about Scandinavian authors, TV series, and films. They are not afraid of the dark. They embrace it, and make it okay somehow.

This book will make you ask some very uncomfortable questions to yourself.

There are damn few things in life that are harder than admitting to yourself that you’re a hypocrite.

P.S. For us, UK folks, this was published as The Scandal.


Get Beartown on Amazon UK (hardcover).

Reading Prompt: A book that involves a bookstore or library #39

According to the diploma I obtained at uni, I’m a librarian. I mean, information scientist, to be precise. Although I have always dreamed about working in a library, spending time among books, I’ve never actually had a job in one. Based on all the stories I’ve read involving librarians, I probably romanticized the idea way too much.

Part of one my uni assignments was to spend sixty hours in our town’s library, and damn, was it awful! I admit, I probably wouldn’t have hated it so much if I got a placement in a nicely equipped library, packed full with all the latest tech, but the lack of working equipment and the constant darkness (the building was an old synagogue) put me off pretty well. We still used those old school index catalogues that were basically little printed index cards in a massive chest of drawers. Good luck finding shit! Before anyone quips in that it was perfectly acceptable in the ’80s, let me make one thing clear: we are talking about 2007.

So, for now I’m just going to stick to books about librarians and quirky little bookstores, where my sentimental ideas live on uninterrupted.

The Library of Shadows by Mikkel Birkegaard
A mystery set in Coppenhagen. After the violent death of Luca Campelli his son, Jon, inherits Luca’s bookshop Libri di Luca, and all sorts of suspicious stuff starts happening.

The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
Danger, clues, secret societies are only a few things Irene, a spy for the mysterious Library, will face in this story while collecting books from other realities.

Adrian Mole: The Capuccino Years by Sue Townsend
Adrian Mole, whom we first met when he was 13 and 3/4 years old, is now all grown up and is working in a book shop. He still writes his diary, and he’s still an annoyingly funny intellectual. I have read this book many times, but I’m tempted to pick it up again.

Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore by Matthew J. Sullivan
Lydia, a bookstore clerk, investigates the death of a customer after she inherits his books filled with mysterious and disturbing messages.

Ink and Bone (The Great Library #1) by Rachel Caine
Jess Brightwell, son of a black market book smuggler, is sent to apply for a scholar position at the Library, where they value knowledge more than human life.

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Genres: Science Fiction, Classics
Published: 7th May, 1895
Goodreads
Series: N/A
Rating: 3.5

“I’ve had a most amazing time….”
So begins the Time Traveller’s astonishing firsthand account of his journey 800,000 years beyond his own era—and the story that launched H.G. Wells’s successful career and earned him his reputation as the father of science fiction. With a speculative leap that still fires the imagination, Wells sends his brave explorer to face a future burdened with our greatest hopes…and our darkest fears. A pull of the Time Machine’s lever propels him to the age of a slowly dying Earth. There he discovers two bizarre races—the ethereal Eloi and the subterranean Morlocks—who not only symbolize the duality of human nature, but offer a terrifying portrait of the men of tomorrow as well. Published in 1895, this masterpiece of invention captivated readers on the threshold of a new century. Thanks to Wells’s expert storytelling and provocative insight, The Time Machine will continue to enthrall readers for generations to come.


You know, what? This wasn’t bad. I generally don’t like time travel stories, because I find all the implications of messing with one’s past just too daunting and mind boggling. This book was different though. The Time Traveller (as he’s referred to throughout the story) has no great agenda to save the world, he just wants to explore, driven by his curiosity.

Just like so many books written in this era, the story is told by an unnamed guy, who witnessed first hand the scientific discussion that lead to the experiment, and the Time Traveller’s recollection of his eight-day adventure into the future. There’s no fluff, no fillers, just crisp, fast paced facts recounted over a dinner.

The future is bleak, society is split into two: the peaceful, innocent, almost childlike Eloi and the bloodthirsty, but technically advanced, ape-like Morlocks. According to the Time Traveller’s theory, society at one point must have reached balance and security, that lead to their degradation.

“But even on this supposition the balanced civilization that was at last attained must have long since passed its zenith, and was now far fallen into decay. The too-perfect security of the Upper-worlders had led them to a slow movement of degeneration, to a general dwindling in size, strength, and intelligence.”

The Eloi are constantly being hunted by the Morlocks, but they do nothing about it, just accept it as the norm. In a way this future seems even scarier than those depicted in dystopian books with the oppressive governments, because they at least still have the chance to revolt and claim back their freedom. The Eloi, who are proper bubbleheads, are way past this.

The conclusion? Humanity is its own worst enemy. No surprise there, unfortunately.

Reading Challenge Prompt: A book about time travel #23

Have you ever wanted to go back in time and change something you’ve done? Yeah, me neither… On the other hand, I understand the appeal of being able to hop back in time just to witness some of the major historical events, even though just being there could cause a rift in time, so these things are better not to be taken lightly.

I could count on one hand the number of time travel books I’ve read and would still have fingers left. Same goes for movies on the topic, so this reading challenge prompt is one of the few that actually fills me with dread. Somehow the sheer idea moving back and forth between alternate timelines stresses me out.

Time travelling is not a new trope. Just think about The Time Machine by H. G. Wells, published in 1895. Ever since then, this theme became quite popular, and not only in the strictly science fiction genre.

Stephen King handled it brilliantly in 11.22.63, and I loved that book to bits. To be fair, in my eyes, he just can’t do anything wrong. I bet even his shopping lists are awesome.

The Beautiful Land by Alan Averill
In this science fiction story, Takahiro O’Leary is hired by the Axon Corporation to explorer multiple timelines that exist parallel to each other.

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
An explorer’s journey 800,000 years into the future. If, like me, you are not particularly keen on time travel stories, but still want to complete the challenge, this short book with its 118 pages would be a good pick.

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Billy Pilgrim becomes unstuck in time after he is abducted by aliens from the planet Tralfamadore.

11.22.63 by Stephen King
Jake, a high school teacher goes back in the past through a portal in a diner’s back room, just in time to witness, and potentially stop the assassination of J. F. Kennedy.

The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes
What happens when the power of time travel falls into the hands of a serial killer?

Invictus by Ryan Graudin
The adventures of a time travelling teenager, Farway Gaius McCarthy, and his crew in a futuristic world. This suspenseful YA read is full of gladiators, snarky banter and teenage love.

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
The story of Clare and Henry, a librarian with Chrono-Displacement Disorder that causes his genetic clock reset periodically, misplacing him in time. A good choice for fans of romances.

Not inspired enough? Join us on the Goodreads Popsugar Challenge group for more.

Reading Challenge Prompt: A book with an ugly cover #38

This is probably one of the most subjective prompts. What do you find aesthetically pleasing? What fills you with absolute horror?

I went through my ever growing list of books I want to read and picked the ones I’ve been putting off for ages, purely because of their dreadful covers. Yes, I’m shallow.

So, I’m going to close my eyes, and give these uglies some love.

Eleven Kind of Loneliness by Richard Yates
A collection of short stories exploring loneliness, failure, heartbreak, and the potentials of purple font in one’s cover design choices…

Roadside Picnic by Arkady & Boris Strugatsky
A shortish sci-fi gem about Red Schuhart, a stalker, who ventures into the Zone to collect mysterious artifacts left behind by aliens. Stalker, the famous movie directed by Andrei Tarkovsky was loosely based on this book.

Accelerando by Charles Stross
A sci-fi story set somewhere between 2010 and 2015, involving cutting edge of intelligence amplification technology and a robot cat. Meow!

Heroes Die by Matthew Woodring Stover
A testosterone filled fantasy story set in a futuristic, dystopian world and an alternate reality called Overworld. If this is not epic, then I don’t know what is… The buff dude on the cover is all right, I can live with that, but damn, those fonts look proper heavy!

Parable of the Sower by Olivia E. Butler
A coming of age story set in a near future (2025) where people live in small, walled communities to protect themselves from the drug crazed scavengers.

Spin by Robert Charles Wilson
A science fiction story set in our present days, revolving around an event called the Big Blackout that made all the stars go out at once. No more romantic, stare gazing dates… There was a time at some point in my kindergarten years when I also loved combining green with a lot of purple.

Dark Water by Koji Suzuki
A short story collection by the author of the Ring. Need I say more? Bonus: once you start reading, you won’t see the cover.

If you need more inspiration to find ugly covers, you can join us in the Goodreads Popsugar Challenge group.

Happy hunting!

Where the Memories Lie by Sibel Hodge

Where the Memories Lie by Sibel Hodge
Genres: Mystery
Published: 22nd September, 2015
Goodreads
Series: N/A
Rating: 3

Chilling family secrets, obsession and decades-old lies. How well do we really know the ones we love? A gripping psychological thriller from the #1 bestselling author of Look Behind You.
Twenty-five years ago Katie ran away from home and never came back. But now she’s suddenly reappeared in her best friend Olivia’s life—in the form of a chilling confession. Olivia’s father-in-law, wracked with guilt, says he murdered her all those years ago. Tom suffers from Alzheimer’s and his story is riddled with error and confusion. Except for one terrifying certainty: he knows where the body is buried.
As Olivia and the police piece together the evidence, they are left with one critical question. They have a crime, they have a confession, and now they have a body—but can any of it be trusted?


So, a family secret, you say? Blurted out by a frail Alzheimer’s patient? Would you really take everything at face value from someone who only last week was under the impression that he’s Gregory Peck? The story had potential, but imagine you stumble upon this secret in the man’s diary. The one he’d written when he was still at full mental capacity… Now that, I could get into.

This book is not really a suspenseful thriller, more a story about a tight knit family and the lengths they would go to protect those they love the most. How far would you go to keep a secret that could destroy your family? Would you ignore all your values and beliefs if they were not suitable anymore? Maybe you are one of those people who is a firm believer of giving out the highest possible sentence to criminals. But if it’s your child on trial? Would that make a difference?

We see the plot unfold from Olivia’s point of view. She’s Tom’s daughter in law, and potentially one of the most annoying characters I came across in recent months. As a nurse, I expected her to be the voice of reason, but as the outsider so to say, of course she had to be the one who triggers all the digging into the past. It just didn’t seem that plausible to me, purely because of the way she found out about the secret.

As we go along, the uneasiness grows, accusations fly around and everyone seems suspicious. Olivia is off the rocker, and the most painful of it all is that she doesn’t use her brain. You want to accuse someone? Fine, but at least don’t show all your “evidence”.

The end twist was nicely done, and I’m actually happy with the resolution. Is it a bit far fetched? Maybe. But I’ve learnt watching all those true crime documentaries is that people are capable of anything.

Get Where the Memories Lie on Amazon UK.