Reading Challenge Prompt: A book about time travel #23

Have you ever wanted to go back in time and change something you’ve done? Yeah, me neither… On the other hand, I understand the appeal of being able to hop back in time just to witness some of the major historical events, even though just being there could cause a rift in time, so these things are better not to be taken lightly.

I could count on one hand the number of time travel books I’ve read and would still have fingers left. Same goes for movies on the topic, so this reading challenge prompt is one of the few that actually fills me with dread. Somehow the sheer idea moving back and forth between alternate timelines stresses me out.

Time travelling is not a new trope. Just think about The Time Machine by H. G. Wells, published in 1895. Ever since then, this theme became quite popular, and not only in the strictly science fiction genre.

Stephen King handled it brilliantly in 11.22.63, and I loved that book to bits. To be fair, in my eyes, he just can’t do anything wrong. I bet even his shopping lists are awesome.

The Beautiful Land by Alan Averill
In this science fiction story, Takahiro O’Leary is hired by the Axon Corporation to explorer multiple timelines that exist parallel to each other.

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
An explorer’s journey 800,000 years into the future. If, like me, you are not particularly keen on time travel stories, but still want to complete the challenge, this short book with its 118 pages would be a good pick.

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Billy Pilgrim becomes unstuck in time after he is abducted by aliens from the planet Tralfamadore.

11.22.63 by Stephen King
Jake, a high school teacher goes back in the past through a portal in a diner’s back room, just in time to witness, and potentially stop the assassination of J. F. Kennedy.

The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes
What happens when the power of time travel falls into the hands of a serial killer?

Invictus by Ryan Graudin
The adventures of a time travelling teenager, Farway Gaius McCarthy, and his crew in a futuristic world. This suspenseful YA read is full of gladiators, snarky banter and teenage love.

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
The story of Clare and Henry, a librarian with Chrono-Displacement Disorder that causes his genetic clock reset periodically, misplacing him in time. A good choice for fans of romances.

Not inspired enough? Join us on the Goodreads Popsugar Challenge group for more.

Reading Challenge Prompt: A book about or involving a sport #19

Whether you are going through the topics in order, or randomly, or ignore some, reading challenges are a good way to get inspiration for your book pics. It’s the first time I actually decided to join one. Other than joining the Goodreads Popsugar Challenge group for ideas, I’m not following any particular order they set. I feel I already imposed enough restrictions on myself. I’m such a free spirit, I know…

The first prompt that grabbed my attention was the sports related one. I’m not a fan of anything or anyone, don’t enjoy or follow any sports in particular, butΒ this doesn’t mean that I couldn’t enjoy a book that has something to do with it. On the contrary. As long as it’s fiction, there’s always hope.

I was very liberal when I picked these eight books, but hey… If you are a sports hater like me, or just don’t enjoy technical non-fiction, these are all safe bets.

Beartown by Fredrik Backman
The book is about a murder, set in a small Swedish town whose only hope for revival is their up and coming ice hockey team.

Trail of Murder (Lee Squires #1) by Christine Andreae
An English teacher & poet turned cook as a protagonist, murder, hiking and horse riding through the wilderness. I told you I was liberal with my pics, and yes, hiking is a sport.

You Will Know Me by Megan Abbott
A story about a fifteen-year-old gymnastics prodigy, murder, jealousy and ambition.

Spud by John van de Ruit
The absolutely hilarious story of John ‘Spud’ Milton, his friends (The Crazy Eight), prepubescent anguish and the love of cricket, set in a posh South-African boarding school during the early ’90s.

Deal Breaker by Harlan Koben
Secrets and lies surround sports agent Myron Bolitar and his favourite rookie quarterback Christian Steele in this suspenseful novel.

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon by Stephen King
A little girl lost in the woods, kept alive by her love for baseball and her fantasies about her favourite player, Tom Gordon coming to her rescue.

Blockade Billy by Stephen King
The chilling story of William ‘Blockade Billy’ Blakely, the greatest baseball player with a dark secret.

Gym Candy by Carl Deuker
A book about the struggles and dreams of running back Mick Johnson who is trying to navigate the cruel world of american football.

New Year, New Books

Happy New Year, fellow readers!

Pic from: Ian Schneider via Unsplash

Hope none of you are suffering from hangover from last night’s celebrations. I spent my New Year’s Eve watching Attack on Titan, stuffing my face with the most amazing festive burger ever (Camembert and cranberry sauce, just sayin’), and sipping on some whiskey because I like to think I’m sophisticated.

This morning the Goodreads Reading Challenge opened for 2018, and feeling empowered by last year’s success, I pledged another 65 books for this year.

So, what’s the plan for 2018 then?

Complete the Popsugar 2018 Reading Challenge. My first reading challenge ever, and while most of the topics are super inspiring and look like fun, I expect I will end up reading some weird shit along the way.

Finish Shift by Hugh Howie. This is the second book in The Wool Trilogy, and I’ve been struggling with it since last July. It’s only 500 pages, so I should have been done with it ages ago, but every time I read a chapter I just get depressed and look for something else. Why finish then? Apparently the third part, Dust, is awesome, and I can’t just skip the middle one, can I…

Get rid of some of my books that are just collecting dust and taking up space. I usually go through my shelves at least once year and donate a bunch of books to charity.

Organize my books on my Kindle. Even though they are not taking up actual shelf space, they can get messy pretty quickly, especially they way I bulk buy e-books. I knew I could create collections but until now I just couldn’t be bothered, because why do it today, if you can do it tomorrow, or in fact why bother, if you don’t have to. However, after I recently stumbled upon some books I had not a single clue I owned, I think it’s time…

Let 2018 bring us new adventures, great books, and fun times!

What are your reading plans for this year? Doing any challenges?